Lymphedema leaking? A simple method of Autopathy can stop it, in no time

How to stop lymphedema from leaking, in only a couple of hours – instead of the “normal” two days

In my previous update, I mentioned a holistic healing method I have been trying since the end of April, and which is awesome so far. More work to be done until I will be able to comfortably wear mini skirts or shorts in public, heels and pretty sandals at all, but there is improvement on this front, too, amongst many other physical symptoms and emotional whatevers where I had been stuck.

The method is called Autopathy and it is developped by a Czech man, Jiří Čehovsky, by using the principles of Homeopathy. Here is a short introductory video to it: https://youtu.be/2D62Eh5QzBo I love the purity of it: you make your own medicine, of yourself.

I will tell you more about my experiences with it another time; now I would like to share one spectacular result, connected to lymphedema.

If you have a bit of time and want to know the juicier details of a summer evening that I had to spend with figuring out a quick and definite solution to freaking leaking lymphedema, instead of enjoying myself in probably one of the loveliest towns in the world, Český Krumlov in Czechia, keep on reading. And if you are in a hurry, you can just jump down on the page, below the gorgeous fountain photo, where I enumerate the exact steps of what I did (assuming you watched the video above and have a basic concept of what Autopathy is about).

Some of us who have lymphedema in a limb, had the nasty experience of the lymphatic fluid leaking, oozing, dripping, trickling from the skin. It is called lymphorrhea and you can read more about it on the Lymphedema People website.

I had it first a few months ago in the pelvic area (where the swelling had extended from my legs), and had no any clue of whatsoever what was going on: for two or three days, I saw my underwear and the front of my skirt or pants getting wet continuously, as if I had peed… Now that is embarrassing, isn’t it? Genital Lymphedema, oh sexy thing. Not. And liners wouldn’t help, they would get soaking wet soon. I discovered a small, read wound which was weeping. It simply ceased after, I think, 3 days – by itself.

I read upon it a bit, and found that leaking is common with lymphedema.

About three weeks ago, it happened on my legs, too. I had a wonderful dip in the river, and when I dried myself with the towel, must have scratched a little spot on my skin, at the middle of the left lower leg, because it started dripping the yellowish lymph fluid and wouldn’t stop.

Back to the house where I did a quick online search on what to do: all the literature I found in a couple of minutes said that I can expect it to last for 24-48 hours, at least. (Even as bad, that patients were hospitalized for two weeks with it or undergo surgery – such horror were and are totally unthinkable for me). I also read that, instead of having my compression stockings on, I have to apply a bandage, to be changed often, for it will soak fast.

Now, all this was not any option for me: an entire day or two (or more) of this mayhem, when I must be dressed up nicely, on my feet and performing? No, thanks.

This is what I did:

The piece of gauze I got from the hostel’s first aid kit, I could throw away almost right away, it became so wet. The only thing I could then stuff into my stocking was a few cosmetic cotton pads, to cover the oozing spot and absorb whatever it possible could. I got dressed and set out to the only pharmacy still open after 6pm, which was quite far away, it took me maybe 45 minutes to get there on foot and by bus.

Needless to say that my stocking up to my thigh and down to my foot, was completely soaked, as well as a big part of my skirt and a little bit of my shoe.

When I showed my leg to the pharmacian, the lady knew right away what kind of bandage to give me. Also a box of steril gauze squares.

I remembered what I have read in an Autopathy testimonial: a woman had an ugly, non-healing wound,since ages. She then would make her own autopathic medicine from the pus of the wound, deluted with 1.5 liter of water, applied to the wound – which in turn, began healing rapidly.

Well, I thought, this is the thing to try.

The pharmacy was in a small shopping mall and I bought a big bottle of mineral water in the supermarket. With that, I went to the handicapped bathroom, took off my shoe and stocking, and prepared my autopathic medicine:

Into the cap of the bottle, I collected as much of the lymphatic fluid coming out of my legs as I could – it was not easy: not even a quarter of the cap was filled in 5 minutes or so.

To make a dilution, I poured the water from the bottle to the cap, from there it went to the sink.

What little water remained in the cap, I applied that to the area on my skin where it was leaking, covered it with gauze, then put my compression garment back on.

I did some food shopping, and had to walk back all the way home, because the next bus came only much later. I had a snack on a bench to gather my strength, and began the long trip.

By the time I got home, my skirt and much of my stocking had dried. The gauze was soaked though, therefore I changed it. Perhaps one hour and a half – or two – lapsed since I applied my improvised potion, and the leaking definitely and remarkably subdued.

I did the same process again: collected some fluid in the cap of a new bottle, diluted it with the 1.5 liter of water, applied the last of it on my skin, covered the spot with gauze. But this time, for the night, I didn’t put on my garment but bandaged that lower leg. And made my bed ready for the mess, with heaps of towels.

This proved unnecessary: my bed remained nice clean and dry, and in the morning when I took off the dressing, it was dry too, I could only see the traces of a very few drops – which means that the oozing stopped practically right after the second application.

And it did not return ever since, although I can still see the tiny red dot on my leg where all this happened.

So this is how I stopped lymphedema leaking from my leg, in two hours or so:

  1. Got a bottle of water, 1.5 liter. It must be non-sparkling and sealed, and not tap water, so as to avoid any kind of contamination or unwanted particles, chemicals, etc. Spring water or distilled water.
  2. I went to a place where I could be undisturbed. This is important in Autopathy: other persons should not be present, so that no-one would interfere with your own energy and vibrations when you make your medicine.
  3. Collected some of the leaking fluid into the cap of the water bottle.
  4. Diluted it with the water, by pouring it from the bottle to the cap, into the sink.
  5. Applied the last drops of the water in the cap (the autopathic preparation) to the problematic area of my skin.
  6. Covered it with clean gauze. (By the second application, this might have not be needed, I could have most probably let it air dry – but I could not tell in advance, how fast the dripping would case).
  7. (Optional, I did not do it): I had read that before covering the spot, it is good to apply moisturizer on the skin, others recommend antibacterial creams of various brands. What I would use when I have it at hand is a gel that is great for both purposes, and for much, much more: Renu28.

I repeated this process 1.5-2 hours later. I had to do it only twice, and this was all. No more leaking of the lymph.

As individual results may vary, maybe you will have to repeat it more times.

Autopathy is a relatively new method, not widely known even in alternative medicine circles, but it is helping more and more people with the most various issues. As far as I have seen, there is not much experience yet in regard treating lymphedema (nor lipedema) with it, and so I am a volountary guinea pig for Autopathy – and a happy one, for it worked!

Therefore I can recommend it to you to try it next time, should the need arise. This application seems to be very effective, quick, simple, inexpensive, and without any possible side-effects. Also, it is compatible with any other treatment as a complementary.

Here is the main Autopathy website for further info: www.autopathy.info

To Your Health,

Andrea

Andrea Gerák (also spelled as Gerak) is a traveling artist from Hungary, mostly known as a singer. She is also photographing, dancing, writing, and forever learning through her journey in the world, living out of a suitcase. Her attention turned to healthy living after a cancer surgery in 2008. Proud mom of a big boy.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s